Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up. Pablo Picasso

As an adult, I remember with a touch of amusement, the bitterness of not finding finger paints in my stocking on Christmas morning. Who could really blame Santa? But the simple joy of playing with those squishy pigments at grade school is a sensation that remains vivid for me today. Art and design have always been interests for me, but aside from relentless doodling, focused art-making was set aside after junior high for academics and athletics.

A work assignment away from home was the catalyst for my return to art-making. I thought I needed a pastime, but so enjoyed a drawing course that art became much more. Sketching and drawing shifted quickly to printmaking and painting, first with watercolours, then acrylics and oils, and finally with mixed media. My background in science led to study and experimentation with each medium until I naturally gravitated to the versatility of acrylics as a base medium with mixed media elements. And science has naturally become a familiar and prevailing ally to my artistic practice.

Science and art are never so far apart as our modern culture would make them seem. As an experimental artist, I see these “opposing” bodies of knowledge as deeply intertwingled. The aesthetics and science of composition, the theoretical and practical pursuit of a deep understanding of the interaction of textures, and the physics and chemistry of paint manipulation are three areas in which I am particularly involved. My work is inspired as often by a scientific principle or an experimental eureka moment as it is by an aesthetic vision.

If I hadn’t become a visual artist, I might have become a mad scientist.